Week #13 Food Prep Guide

We recommend that you set aside 15-30 minutes to unload your produce and do some quick preparations to help your food last as long as possible. Please consider the following preparation tips to make the most of your purchase.


*Wash all produce before use and either scrub or remove the peels.*

*Pickle or freeze anything you don’t plan to cook in 3-5 days.*


Celery. Refrigerate your celery as soon as possible or it will go limp; if this happens, you can prop it in a cup of water in the refrigerator just like you would do for herbs or freeze it right away. Wrap the celery in a lightly dampened paper towel, then place in a plastic bag and store in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. It should keep for up to two weeks. Celery can also be frozen. Wash, cut into your desired size (i.e. diced for soup), then place in a single layer without touching on a lined baking sheet and partially freeze for 30-60 minutes before transferring to an airtight container. Celery pieces will be soft when thawed and are best for cooked preparations like soup or stew.


Parsley & scallions. Untie the bunch. Place in a mason jar or cup and add a few inches of clean water, just enough to cover only the bottom of the stems. Drape a plastic bag loosely over the top of the leaves, allowing some air to circulate. Wash and use as soon as possible for best quality. Scallion roots can be replanted into a countertop pot or in your garden and will regrow.


Paste tomatoes. Store on the counter, never in the refrigerator. These sauce tomatoes are excellent for processing but nonetheless tasty enough for raw preparations. If you want to use them fresh, simply wash in a 1:8 vinegar to water bath, rinse, and dry before use. If you freeze them, you can actually freeze them whole with the core removed. When they thaw, the skin skips right off for use in sauces or soups. We have provided a generous 1.5 lbs, which is enough for a single batch of quick tomato sauce or gazpacho.


Cherry tomato mix. Store on the counter, never in the refrigerator. If you want to use them fresh, simply wash in a 1:8 vinegar to water bath, rinse, and dry before use. If you freeze them, you can actually freeze them whole. When they thaw, the skin skips right off for use in sauces or soups.


Dragon Tongue beans. Store unwashed in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator and cook as soon as you can, or meal prep by blanching and storing. Wash in very cold water and remove the stem and any fibrous strings before use. To freeze, place blanched beans on a lined baking sheet and partially freeze for 30-60 minutes before transferring to an airtight container.


Marrow squash. Marrow is a full-sized, mature summer squash that has been allowed to develop a thicker skin that is inedible. These are not suitable to eating raw; however, when roasted and fully cooked, they are similar to spaghetti squash. Keep the squash whole, dry, and unwashed in a paper towel-lined zip top bag and place them in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator. We find that they often keep for a week or more this way. When you are ready to eat them, completely scoop out the seed cavity (you can save the seeds to roast like pumpkin seeds) before cooking. We recommend that you par-cook and then stuff with rice, protein, and a sauce and finish it in the oven, or roast with olive oil, peel, and puree for a quick meal component to have on hand in the fridge or freezer.


Garlic. Store on the counter in a dry spot out of direct sunlight. Cool moisture, like in the refrigerator, will encourage the garlic to sprout which gives the cloves a bitter flavor. Stored properly, garlic can last for a few months. This variety is ‘German White’ and is known for its very large cloves and hot flavor.

Quick & Fresh White Wine Tomato Sauce

1 lb cooked spaghetti

1 c reserved pasta cooking water

1-2 tbsp olive oil

2 large cloves of garlic, minced

1/4 onion, grated, or the white parts of a bunch of scallions, minced

salt and pepper to taste

a bottle of white wine that you enjoy drinking (alternatively, use chicken stock)

1 1/2 lbs tomatoes, blanched, peeled, and chopped

fresh chopped parsley

shavings of Pecorino Romano cheese


Sauté the onion and garlic with salt and pepper over medium low heat until they are completely tender but not yet browned. Deglaze the pan with a generous splash of wine (1/4-1/2 c) and scrape any browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Add the tomatoes. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook for about 10 minutes or until the sauce is reduced and homogenous. Add the cooked spaghetti to the pan with just a splash of the reserved pasta cooking water to prevent clumping, and cook for a few more minutes. Add more pasta water in small splashes as needed to reach your desired consistency. Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and Pecorino Romano. Pairs well with grilled chicken and shrimp.

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